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Tag: costume play

Cosplay 4

Competition in Cosplay: What’s So Bad About It?

“Competition” is a dirty word in the world of cosplay. It scares and angers some; as they dread the idea of “elitists” approaching cosplay with such a mindset. Recently, I came across a tweet by @0Becki expressing concern towards those with this mentality.  They felt that cosplay is a hobby and not a competition, that they should share tips with others, and they should hang out with cosplayers (who are cosplaying as the same character).

I’ve mixed feelings about this.  I agree; cosplay is a hobby. People should share tips, be friendly,  and help others.   But they aren’t entitled to do such things.  People have the right to be competitive with their passion. Competition is natural in any field.  Competitive cosplayers enjoy it as it pushes them to work hard on their skills and talent to become the best. As long as it’s not toxic, competition isn’t bad.

We need competitive cosplayers.

beckii_tweet.jpg

Competitive cosplayers have the driving need to win and outperform everyone else in the niche.  To them, every little detail matters to ensure victory. The perfect wig.  Professional grade makeup. The exact color contact lens.  Superior craftsmanship. They have no tolerance for error. It’s the difference between being just a cosplayer and becoming the cosplayer. First place or second place in a cosplay contest.  And trust me: nobody remembers the second place winner.  For the hobbyist cosplayer, this might be hard to understand.  That’s okay: you lack the competitor’s spirit.  Unless they attack you, don’t hate on these people.

It’s who they are – they can’t help it.

It’s funny how hobbyist cosplayers get angry at the “elitists” for their competitiveness.  Yet, they love these high-performing manga artists, ruthless anime directors, passionate game designers, what have you.  Why it’s okay to praise those people for their high levels of desire and drive but it’s wrong for cosplayers to act the same?

You’re a hypocrite if you praise one group but shame another for the same thing.

Competition is great.  It drives others to better themselves.  It forces you to become innovating.  It encourages change. If a cosplayer above your skill level trashes your cosplay, instead of being mad and pissed, use that as inspiration to prove them wrong and better your cosplay.

They talk shit about your wig (or lack of)? Buy a high-quality wig. A snobby cosplayer thinks your skirt for your cosplay is trash?  Hire the best seamstress in your community to make you one better to prove that asshole wrong.  Better yet, study the best cosplayers in your community and learn how they won rewards, got their fame, and so forth.  Use that anger, the power of the dark side as you will, to better your cosplay game so that one day, nobody will ever talk shit about your cosplay again.

Or beat their ass.  I don’t care.

REVERSAL:  Not everyone is competitive.  Hobbyist cosplayers far outnumber the competitive.  I’m not telling you to be humble or lower your standards, but keep in mind that your attitude could offend – thus furthering tainting the cosplay community. It can also ruin your reputation, which you must guard with your life.   To quote Robert Greene’s 48 Laws of Power: ‘Know who you’re dealing with – do not offend the wrong person.’ and ‘Think as you like but behave like others.’

Yes, be competitive but only compete with those at or above your skill level.  Simply acting arrogant and prideful towards those below your skill level will only stir up hatred and anxiety against you.  Nobody will want to work or be around you if your attitude is nasty.

If you know a group of cosplayers are having fun, don’t ruin it for them.  Suggest ways to help them improve their cosplay skills in a friendly, loving tone.  Don’t mock a cosplayer for something they can’t control (such as race, color tone, gender,  disabilities, etc.). Remember: you too were once a hobbyist cosplayer who didn’t know any better. So spread the knowledge (but not too much of it)

Sometimes, it’s better to feared than loved.  Sometimes, it’s better to be loved than hated.

Cover image source:
https://www.kotaku.com.au/2015/09/australias-best-cosplayer-will-win-this-sexy-golden-dragon/

Anime community 5

Post-Con Blues: I Don’t Get It (Litterally and Figuratively)

In my eight years of traveling to conventions and browsing through convention social media pages/groups, there is one ailment that tends to impact many an otaku: Post-Con Blues.  Post-Con Blues is the feeling of depression and sadness at the end of a convention.  Many will have to wait a year or so to see their cosplaying friends and weird ass costumed brethren, dealing with the “normies” of the real world.  I’m going to be real: I do not get this post-con blues thing. It sounds goofy to me.  Ever since my first convention (Anime St. Louis 2010) I never felt this feeling of sadness.  Did it suck that I had to return to the real world after my first convention? Kinda.

 

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A Sayaka cosplayer crying in her hotel room while her Madoka cosplaying friend awkwardly looks on.

 

I say kinda only because I figured years ago if I go back to work, spend and save my money wisely, I could continue and traveling to conventions and write about my experience on them (althrough seven years later after my first convention but whatever, I’m lazy).  Going to conventions weekend after weekend would burn me out and destroy my bank account.  Seeing the same people and cosplays would bore me quick.

Another counter messaurement I have for post-con blues is my hobbies outside of anime.  I love reading books (business, self-help/education, money, etc.) – so I focus my attention on those things.  I kick it with my friends when we’re free. Watching anime helps as well…when I have the time (being an adult working 60 hours a week is brutal).

Something to help keep my mind off cons for a bit.

If I do get upset after a convention, it’s more so I’m leaving a more cultured city and returning to the hellhole that is Saint Louis, lmfao.  I remember being treated with so much love at Atlanta when my  crew went to Anime Weekend Atlanta back in 2014.  People were friendly, polite, helpful, and not on some bullshit back in St. Louis.  I love St. Louis, but we are fucking backwards.  We are too slow to catch trends and by the time we do get trends, it’s too late.  I’m not saying Atlanta is perfect, but when you know your city barely has any culture and you go to a city full of it, it changes your mind about your hometown.

Now, my next statement will be harsh. Cruel even.  But you guys know me – I don’t care for the feelings of others (for the most part).   I personally (again, I) think if you have post-con blues, that simply means you have no life outside of your anime hobbies.  Sorry, but that’s how I feel. If your life revolves around whacky ass Japanese cartoons (and you’re not making money or major moves off it), you live a sad life.  If you use conventions to escape your problems rather than reward yourself for solving them (that you can control mind you), you’re an idiot.

To conclude this short little essay or freewrite or whatever, I don’t’ get post con blues.  Never have and never will.  I feel that I have means to avoid that shit and do better myself, but that’s just me. If you have post con blues, then do something about it rather than whine about it.

Peace.