Whoever coined the phrase “It’s the journey, not the destination” must have been a loser. Clearly, they never hit their goals. So, rather than push through and try again, they gave up.  They figured “Well, I couldn’t get to where I wanted so I settle for less to make me happy.”  How the hell could you be happy with just the journey?  Sure, you can learn from it, but ultimately, you want to hit your destination – your goals.  The journey is hard, tiresome, and full of trails.  Everyone goes through it when they’re trying to get to their destination, so it’s nothing special.   I rather talk about the destination instead.

We have these losers who hold on to that phrase to heart. These losers want to tell others that it’s okay to give up on the destination just so they can feel good.  Sorry, I don’t feel good when I don’t hit my goals or arrive at my destination.   I hate it.  How can I feel good if I didn’t hit success?  “But you can learn from your failures!”  Sure, you can.  But when you fail so often you want to win.  I think its just better to learn from the victory, analyze how you won, and repeat the methods/steps from your victory to ensure massive success and victories over time.

Let’s compare this to one of my most beloved JRPGs of all time: Final Fantasy 4 (and because I’m listening to the overworld theme as I write this).  His goal in the first act of Final Fantasy 4 was to cleanse his soul from that Dark Knight bullshit.  He felt guilty for his sins and wanted to atone himself.  In order to do so, he had to go on that Heroe’s Journey or whatever.  Cool.  But his ultimate goal was to clear his past sins and atonement.

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If you played Final Fantasy 4, you wanted to get the Paladin class for Cecil.  I bet you were tired of grinding for hours and wanted to push forward.  I know I was.  You wanted to see Cecil better himself and reach that goal.  You wanted, no needed to see him achieve.   That’s how we should be with goals and destination.  There’s a funny line in the game.  When Cecil speak to one of the Mystia elders who had knowledge about the Paladin class, the elder flat out told him the truth.

Cecil asks how many people failed in their quest to become a Paladin.  The Elder starts to laugh and say “Failed? No, they died!”  The failures don’t get to tell their tale of how they almost obtained that paladin class – because they died.   But Cecil was able to tell the tale.  Nobody wants to listen to stories from failures who almost did things or about their journeys.  Everyone has their stories about their journey. Nobody cares about the journey, we wanna hear about the destination.

Anyone can go on a journey.  But few can arrive at the destination. Very few.

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