Mark Twain once said, “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.” Anyone who does not think Averages: Infinity Wars is a masterpiece superhero film obviously stands opposite to the majority.   Bored at work, I decided to make a shitpost on some Black nerd anime group stating that I do not think Infinity War was a great film (despite the fact I have yet to see it and I wanted to stir up a flame war). The post was merely an excuse to secretly give spoilers of characters dying (as I used a gif of Beerus of Dragon Ball Super erasing Zamasu from existence: a subtle hint to what Thanos did half the universe in the movie).

As expected, Marvel fanboys (who can’t handle the fact people won’t dickride their favorite movies/comics) attacked me. They called me a troll, a hater, insane, whatever insults they could use against during their blind fanboy rage.  I simply laughed: as they didn’t know I never watched the movie (and I was going off spoilers I read online). Manipulative? Yes.  Yes, it was.  Do I care? Nope. Anyways, scrolling through yet another masterpiece troll post of mines I came across a post with the Kirby meme “Hating on popular things doesn’t make you interesting.”

hating-popular-things-doesnt-make-you-an-interesting-person-32078954
I love this meme.  Love to make fun of it given how silly it is to think that way.  See, I think people who don’t like things others enjoy are interesting.  They bring something different to the table. A unique taste or flavor so to speak. It gets boring talking to people who share similar interests.  I rather have somebody who’s a bit of an outlier around.  You can’t debate and/or argue with people that share your views – you don’t learn at all from them.

Somebody who has opposite viewpoints, you can learn from them.

By interacting with those who may not share your views, you learn what makes them tick. Somebody may not Pokemon, but they love Digimon.  They might be willing to share their love of Digimon with you to give you an insight of thin passion.  You get invited to go over to their house to watch a few episodes of it and you may even enjoy it.  Dealing with people who are opposite of you is great. Furthermore, you’ll learn skills to handle situations where somebody might have a disagreement with you.

Do you really think you’re an interesting person because you like what’s popular – just like everyone else?  You’re not.  You’re not different.  You’re boring. Bland.  Uninspiring.  Whenever I see a post like “hating on popular things doesn’t make you cool” or whatever, that just tells me this: “I am secretly insecure about the things I enjoy and I can’t’ handle criticism on it because I don’t have confidence towards it.” Confident people don’t let the “hate” get to their head. They just move on with their lives, heads held up high knowing what they enjoy is hot shit.  Nobody can tell them otherwise. So what if people hate things you enjoy?  Stop reacting to the hate and do you.

I believe this world needs that balance of people loving and hating on popular things.

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