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Uzaki-Chan and Fake Otaku Outrage [VIDEO]

Fake Otaku Outrage: Artificial, baseless  outrage generated by those of the anime community to stir up and create conflict, “controversy”, and complaints over and from petty superficial topics and subject matter.  Certain otaku will find the most minor thing to complain about as a way to create  gossip and discourse that do not lead to anything tangible overtime.

Why is there fake otaku outrage towards Uzaki-Chan and how do you prevent yourself from being swept up by fake otaku outrage?

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How Being Gameless Can Cost You With Rent-A-Girlfriend [VIDEO]

Join me as I break down how being gameless and having a lack of self-awareness can cost you big in this world by using the hit romcom Summer 2020 anime “Rent-A-Girlfriend”. What is game?  Why do you need game to better yourself as a person? How do you value yourself as a person?  What could Kazuya could done to better his situation?

The Swarthy Nerd Podcast:
https://swarthynerd.com/

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Ending The 25 Days of Blogging

Hello dear readers,

If you’ve been following me for these 25 days of blogging goal, then you may be upset that I’m ending it today.  As much as I wanted to tackle this goal for myself, I’ve missed my personal deadline for achieving this it: produce 25 blog posts within 25 days starting on December 1st  and ending on December 25th.  I did not hit this deadline.  Reason being is that I foolishly picked a time in which I would be incredibly busy at my restaurant gig; which didn’t allow me the free time to work on 25 posts within 25 days.  Working overtime during the Holidays means I only have time to eat and sleep. For most, some would see this as failure.

But, I don’t see it as failure; it’s a step in a different direction.

I realized that it would be better for me to take my time tackling a single subject for maximum impact is much wiser.  Creating a post is like cooking stew or broth:  you must take time to prep the ingredients before putting it in the pot for a long boil. Once you put the stew or broth on the burner, you must wait until it’s ready.

If the stew or broth isn’t ready, don’t take it off the burner.

This is what I felt as I was creating topics and drafts for my content for this 25 days blogging goal.  As I was coming up with drafts for the project, it dawn on me that it would be best to treat each topic as cooking stew: write notes and ideas around the topics, create an outline, write/edit 3-5 drafts,  post online, repeat. If it’s not ready, I will not post online until it is.  I would rather much give you the product when it’s hot, hearty, and ready – not when it’s still a cold, unseasoned mess.

I rather much have you consume a long, yet informative thought provoking post from me that will make you say “damn, I can’t wait for his next post” then for me to post a short, bare topic each day for you to read and forget about the next day with another short, bare topic that’ll be soon forgotten about (plus, it helps my SEO ranknings).

So, until I quit my job and do my own thing (which is one of my early 2020s goal), I won’t do something as foolish as make 25 blog posts in 25 days.  I rather focus on one at a time and produce that then to tackle a challenge like that again. Once I free myself from working for somebody else at a 9-to-5 plus overtime, I’ll do the 25 Days of Blogging again.

chika_never_again

Until next time

-Yuki The Snowman

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25 Days Of Blogging Day 12: Cosplay: A Quick Rundown

gundam_boz

WHAT IS COSPLAY?
Cosplay, using the combination of the words “costume” and “play”, is the performance art in which people (or cosplayers) wear costumes and fashion items modeled after a specific character from movies, anime, manga, TV series, books, comics, Western animation, and etc.

The term “cosplay” was coined by movie producer Nobuyuki Takahashi after he attended the 1984 World Science Fiction Convention (or Worldcon) in Los Angeles.

The following is an excerpt from Brian Ashcraft’s and Luke’s Plunekett book’s Cosplay World on how Takashi came up with the word “cosplay”:

“In the 1970s, Japanese college students began dressing up as manga and anime characters. These young people had grown up on a steady diet of comics and cartoons, and when they attended manga and anime conventions (as well as school and university festivals), going in character was, as in the West, a way to express fandom.

Sci-fi conventions had existed in Japan since the 1960s, but in 1975 Comic Market (aka Comiket) launched, creating a venue for self-published comics. It was a fan convention and, in this environment, what would become cosplay in Japan started to flourish. There was already a Japanese term to express the concept of dressing up: kasou (仮想).

However, the word carried a nuance of disguise and didn’t quite capture the spirit of what cosplay had become. In the West the word ‘masquerade’ could be used to refer to costuming, but when Takahashi and some university friends tried to translate ‘masquerade’ into Japanese for a magazine article they were writing, it sounded ‘too noble and old fashioned’. According to Takahashi, ‘We needed to find another way to express the concept.’

Various terms were floating around. ‘We had heard the English word “costume” and seen events with names like “Costume Show”, “Kasou Show”, “Hero Play” and whanot,’ says Takahashi. In Japanese, English and other foreign words are often combined and/or shortened, for brevity’s sake. For example, the Japanese for ‘remote control’ – rimooto kontorooru – is shortened to rimokon. ‘So we started to think of different combinations,’ Takahashi says. ‘Finally, we came up with “cosplay”.’ The term was a portmanteau of ‘costume’ and ‘play’. It was perfect.”

Source: https://kotaku.com/where-the-word-cosplay-actually-comes-from-1649177711

WORD ORIGIN OF COSTUME:
Early 18th century: From French and Italian costume ‘custom, fashion, habit”. From Latin consuetudo, which means custom or useage

WORLD ORIGIN OF PLAY:
Old English pleg(i)an ‘to exercise’, plega ‘brisk movement’, related to Middle Dutch pleien ‘leap for joy, dance’.

HOW DID I DISCOVER COSPLAY?

g-phoria.jpg

G4 Tech TV’s G-Phoria 2003 award show:
One day in 2004, I came home from summer high school to discover that my dad brought new channels on the cable box – G4 being one of them.  The first show on G4 was G-Phoria 2003 award show (in preparation for the 2004 live show). Never seen an award show for video games, so I sat down and watched.  After a few gaming presentations, there was for Kingdom Hearts – featuring cosplayers doing a skit based on a scene from the game (One of them in black face. Dunno how they let that one slide on TV).

After that, they brought out around 15-20 cosplayers on the stage, each posing and showcasing their costumes and props.  I never seen this kinda shit before.  I never knew people made costumes based off fictional characters for fun.  Went online and saw that people cosplay at conventions and how there were anime cons all over America were people do the shits.  I was blow away to say the least.  It made me wanted to go to conventions.

…and then I played a romhack of Final Fantasy 6 (FF3 in  the USA) called “Awful Fantasy 3” where the romhackers made fun of cosplayers, the art of cosplay, and how cosplayers  are highly immature and love causing drama  at conventions.

Thanks Something Awful for that reality check. I never went to a convention since.

final_fantasy_6_relm_arrowny_kills_a_baby.png
A Relm cosplayer kills her unwanted baby during a cosplay skit in Awful Fantasy 3

 

WHO COSPLAYS?
People of all races, backgrounds, nationality, and ages cosplays.  From Teenagers wearing their first store-brought cosplay online to 20 and 30 something professional cosplayers who craft their own cosplays from hands and brought shame and embarrassment to their family, to even old ladies in wheelchairs rockin’ schoolgirl uniforms, everyone cosplays.  No matter how old or young, people cosplay. And they cosplay whoever they want to.

Now, you do have those in the cosplay community who think certain people shouldn’t cosplay (i.e.; racist white elitists cosplayers who think dark skin and Black people shouldn’t cosplay as Asian people even though these white boys and girls are cosplaying as Asian characters), but that’s a topic for another day where I make low-self-esteem having  racist cosplayers by attacking their insecurities rooted from childhood until they commit suicide by blowing their brains out in their Sailor Moon or Goku cosplays.

WHERE CAN YOU COSPLAY?
Well, you can cosplay anywhere, but keep in mind that cosplaying outside of convention events will mark you as a weird ass socially awkward  idiot unaware of social cues. With that said, the world is your backdrop for your cosplays.  Go dress as Marisa Kirisame from Touhou high off shrooms in the woods.  On casual Fridays at the gig do homage to Urien’s pin stripped suit from Street Fighter V by matching his grey pin stripped suit, purple oxford shirt, cognac colored belt and shoes.  Dress as Junko Kanno from ZombieLand Saga while completely coked out like any other 80s pop music star at your college’s music hall.

Cosplay anywhere you want.

For the rest us who have common sense and understand the rules/norms of society, save the cosplay for conventions or do them subtly in public or in the workforce. If you live in a society where public cosplay in frown upon or even forbidden outside of events (i.e. Japan), don’t wear your cosplay to the event.  Pack it in a small carry-on bag and don’t put it on until you get to the event.

Sources on the Japan’s negative views on public cosplay:

How Do You Cosplay in Japan by the Cosplay.com Community?

https://cosplay.com/archive/thread/5dgg46/how-do-you-cosplay-in-japan

What To Expect When Cosplaiyng in Japan by R. Lowen”

https://aroundakiba.tv/stories/cosplaying-guide-japan/

The Lowdown on Japan’s Cosplay Industry

https://japantoday.com/category/features/lifestyle/the-lowdown-on-japans-cosplay-industry

they_wont_understand_you_in_japan
Don’t cosplay in public.

WHERE AND HOW CAN YOU BUY AND GET COSPLAYS CREATED

There are options.

If you’re cosplaying as a character who wear everyday clothing (examples includes Shirou Emiya from the fate series with his grey and white baseball v-neck shirt and blue jeans or Reigen from Mob Pyscho 100 with his suit and tie) then it’s just as simple as going your local clothing store (such as Goodwill, JC Penny, Nordstorm, Jos. A Bank, Tom Ford, etc.) and buying the clothes there.  You may have to do some alternations, but they’re minor.

nordstorm.jpg
Useful store to buy casual cosplay pieces

For cosplaying characters with unique clothing that you can’t find in stores (certain school outfits,  armor, body suits such as Solid Snake’s sneaking suit), then you going to get them custom made.  Amazon and eBay have stores where vendors sell pre-made cosplays or you can go online for website that specialize in creating cosplays. Please keep in mind that online cosplay shops tend to be a little on the cheap and mass produced side of the game, so the quality may not be of that of a professional made cosplay.

If you do not want to go on the cheap side of the cosplay game and you want high quality, then you will have to pay a decent amount of cash to get your cosplay created. Don’t know anyone who creates cosplays? Then check your local convention city scene for cosplay creators (such as anime con Facebook groups).

And if you really want to do it yourself, you can learn how to.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF COSPLAYS

With so many people of different backgrounds, races, ethnic groups, and creativity it’s nearly impossible to list all the different type of cosplay within the realm of cosplay. With that said, here are the most common type of cosplays you will find at conventions.

  1. The classic anime schoolgirl. Easily ID’d by her (or his) sera-fuku, pleated skirt, penny loafers, white blouse and ribbon. On the the preppy side of the school uniform game , the schoolgirl cosplayer wears a blazer, button-down shirt, v-neck sweater, tie, etc. Commonly seen at anime cons.
    monika_off_ddlc_cosplay.jpg
  2. Armored cosplay. A cosplay that revolves around armored characters (fantasy characters, giant robots, mech suits, etcs.) Can be found at sci-fi, comic, and anime cons
    greatest_iron_man_cosplay.jpg
  3. Superhero cosplays. Leaping out the colorful pages of American comics into the real world, these cosplayers focus on the larger-than-life heroes from Marvel Comics, Darkhorse, DC, and more.  Can be recognized by their long capes, one piece zentai suits, and hero emblem.  Often seen at comic book conventions but have been making their way into anime cons.
    20190517_103553.jpg
  4. Closet Cosplay. Cosplays that uses everyday clothing (as mentioned earlier) that can be found at stores or in your own closet.  Very simple and easy to pull off – but, in order to stand out from other closet cosplayers – you need to put in the effort (mixing high and low cost items, using a high quality wig, etc.)
  5. Genderswap cosplay. As the name states, it’s cosplays in which the cosplayer switches the canon gender of the character.  Example: a grown ass man with a full beard gender swapping Shouko  Komi (form Komi-San Can’t Commicate). Instead of wearing her red skirt, he swaps them out for red chino slacks. For the vice versa: a woman cosplaying as Goku (Dragon Ball series).
  6. It’s crossdressing, but in cosplay.
    sailor_bubah.jpg

WHY COSPLAY?
Because you have no personality whatsoever and nobody loves you unless you put on an outfit based off a fictional character.

Plus, ever dressed up as Oishi from Higurashi no Naku Koro ni doing  Hennessy shots with a dude cosplaying as Keiichi  while his homegirl cosplaying as Rena Ryuguu gotten into a drunken fist fight with  an Ai Enma cosplayer over some internet weeaboo con drama while a  Terra Brandford is grinding her ass on a Celes Chere cosplayer at a hotel party on an average day?

Didn’t think so.

Until next time!
-Yuki The Snowman

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25 Days Of Blogging Day 11: Don’t Be Sorry

“Do you know what the most convenient phrase in the world is? It’s “I’m sorry.”
-Shadow Maya, Persona 2: Innocent Sin

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A baby-boomer father and his millennial aged son are walking down a busy street in Harlem.  The father, John Shaft II is giving advice to his son, John Shaft Jr. (or J.J.), about being brave towards and around women, having a powerful manly spirit, and never being and saying sorry towards women.

J.J., perhaps due to his upbringing by his single mother and cultural influence of being a Milliennial, whole heartedly disagrees with his father’s teachings. He believes that women don’t like being told what to do. Shaft II counters his son arguments; stating that men used to be men in his day; while the men of the millennial generation worried too much about what women think and feel. To Shaft II, the millennial men  are embarrassing themselves, and that men always own up to who they are.

However, J.J. believes that real men should take reasonability for their wrongdoings.
He is both wrong and right.

(Note: If you don’t know already, the scene described above was from the 2019 movie Shaft 2019. I was going to upload a video of said scene, but WordPress won’t let me.)

In most situations (keyword for you idiots who tend to get emotional over this topic matter: MOST), you should never apologize for your actions and who you are as a person. Example: There are people who aren’t confident with whom they are.  They will be comfortable with their selves.  So, when encountering others who have accepted themselves – flaws and imperfections included – they are fuming with jealous and envy.  “Who the fuck does that asshole think he is?” they might say to themselves.  Or, they might say “That bitch think she’s hot shit when she’s really not!”  out of spite and anger.  They’ll say some passive aggressive statement towards their target of hatred in order to make them conform and/or to knock them down a peg.

If you find yourself in a situation with such a person, you must do two things:

  1. Stand strong, be yourself and check them on the spot.
  2. Run far away from them. They will do nothing but poison your mind and bring you down to their bitterness.

You must never  say sorry to them.

Constantly saying sorry when not needed can be a sign of weakness or worse – manipulation – may the latter be done consciously or unconsciously. If you’re constantly analogizing to everyone over the slightest little error or mishap, people will not take you seriously. They will get annoyed with you quick.  Saying sorry every three sentence during a casual lighthearted conversation will turn people off towards you.  It shows that you’re way emotional.

Now, I understand that some people who grew up in an abusive household with narcissistic parent(s) or older sibling. Others were in an abusive relationship with a controlling, manipulative partner; so saying sorry to others is common. You’re dreadful of offending others due to ill experiences with toxic people.  Therefore, I understand why you might say sorry constantly. To that, I say this in the most living way possible: please seek professional help and don’t beat yourself up.

Using abuse as a segue lead for the topic; saying sorry can be used as a tool of manipulation.  Let’s say an abusive male hits his girlfriend after a heated argument over his flirty, cheating nature.  He might say “I’m sorry, I don’t know what came over me.”, knowing full well his anger of him being caught up in his web of lies got the best of him.  Because the abusive man knows his girlfriend is emotionally dependent, he lies and says it won’t happen again to keep her – until it happens again and the cycle repeats.

You’re not sorry.
You’re full of shit.

You may be wondering when should you say sorry.  Well, there are a few situations when you should say sorry, mean it, and be cautious to not repeat the offense again.  If you offend a person through your actions (actual offense: not this politically correct nonsense these social justice warrior liberals believe is offensive) and you know you were in the wrong, the yes: say sorry. If you loudly barge into a quiet, peaceful room (on accident) and disturb the peace of the room, then say sorry and never do it again next time.  If you bring somebody into a situation they didn’t want to be in, take them out of it and say sorry.

Other than that, never be sorry.  Never say sorry.

Until next time

-Yuki The Snowman

 

25 Days of Blogging 2

25 Days of Blogging Day 10: Branching Out

25 Days of Blogging.  It’s like the 25 Days of Christmas, but without the creepy uncle tramazing you during the family’s holiday party. 

Day 9

As per yesterday’s post, I stated that while sticking to one thing is good, and you need to perfect one trade, rather than to tackle multiple trades at once, sooner or later, you will need to branch out to prevent burn out (as well as reinventing yourself: a topic I will cover much much later in the future).  Branching out and reinventing yourself is a great thing for personal growth. I feel that once you have mastery over one field, you should branch out into something else.

I myself have done some branching out lately.  Perhaps one of my best post of the year, The Guts To Be What You Wanna Be is a prime example of me branching out of comfort zone of anime blogging. Rather than sticking with anime for the entirety of the post, I used the iconic restaurant scene from Scarface to describe how you should draw power and courage from being yourself in a world full of cowardly fake men and women (who aren’t honest with who they are).  Of course, anime was later involved (as I mentioned anime series Megalo Box and The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya for the post).

For the past few months, I’ve been slowly getting into live action shows television and films. The other day, I brought a DVD copy of Shaft 2019 after watching the movie on a flight to St. Louis from Atlanta this past November.  I’m also thinking of buying the first two seasons of the hit FX crime drama Snowfall: based around the 1980s cocaine boom of Los Angeles.  I was put on to Snowfall by my friend and podcast partner, The TV Guru 108/Super Lost Fan 108 after recording a podcast episode a few months ago.

The first episode of Snowfall I watched was Cash and Carry of season 3.  If memory serves me right correctly, Franklin was being screwed over by his cocaine plug, Avi, who was trying to use Franklin money for an offshore banking account (for Avi’s money laundry scheme). Avi arranges a trip to Panama Islands for them both in order to put Franklin’s cash in the account. Franklin quickly realizes Avi’s scheme to screw him over. So, Franklin starts putting him in check: forcing  Avi to pay him back, using Avi’s staff members against him, and makes Avi turn over his own private plane for Franklin’s personal usage.

It was that time I realized how powerful storytelling in live action TV could be over anime – perhaps even superior.

franklin_checking_avi.png

 

Now, let’s say I were blog about live action television and films (which I’m planning to do in the future).  By targeting fans of the live action demographic, I’ll have an increased fan base beyond anime and otaku culture.  An increased of topics to talk about means an increase of people.  More people due to having various topic matters of entertainment means more traffic to my blog. More traffic means more money in my pockets.  The more money I have, the more likely  I have freedom from the 9-to-5 rat race; thus, I have more time to talk and blog about television shows and anime.

You don’t necessary have to branch out for money reasons like I’m aiming for (however, I also love talking about anime and TV shows in general). For you, you might want to branch out for personal growth.  You’re tired of being in one place all the time, so you decide to dive into something new to better yourself as a person.  Certain ventures require new skills to be learned.  Having new skills in your arsenal means you’ll have more doors open for you in this world.

It could be for personal growth. You want to add more skill sets.  It could mean more doors opening for you.  An increased of options can be given upon to you if you branch out.  Your net worth and network grows larger.  If you’re tired of being stuck with one thing I highly recommend branching out.  It’s great for your brand and personal life.

Until next time

-Yuki The Snowman

FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA:

The Swarthy Nerd Podcast
A Black nerd empowerment podcast where Black nerds (well, all nerds, but Black first and foremost) can get together and talk freely about nerd culture while also acknowledging systematic white supremacy and racism in the nerd and Eastern otaku fandoms. Every Tuesday join @superlostfan108 and @weebtrashyuki the founders of http://www.swarthynerd.com for there very informative podcast talking about all things nerdy. No desperate boot licking self hating negus who were never accepted by Black norimes for being too weird for  their love of anime and comic books by the Black community allowed. Go drink bleach.

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25 Days of Blogging Day 9: Sticking To One Thing

The 25 Days of Blogging.  It’s like ABC’s Family 25 Days of Christmas, but 25% more vulgar and offensive like your drunk ass Uncle during your family reunions. 

Day 8

Jack of all trades yet a master of none.  An all-arounder. but he is never staying with just one thing. Skilled and involved in many trades and he has complete dominance in neither nor. He wears many hats but you can’t pinpoint his trademark head wear.

We might know this guy. He bounces form one project to another.  One day, he’s working on a blog.  The next, a podcast.  Next week he opens a successful online drop shipping business.  The following month he’s flipping old clothes online for profit.  Next year he is running an anime YouTube channel.  He’s all over the place. You can’t pin him down – and not in a good way.

After a while (may it be from burnout or multiple projects failing), he starts to slow down.  He backs off from YouTube and podcasting for the written word: blogging.  He ends his drop shipping business and focus on flipping clothes.  He has realized that sticking to one thing and direct complete focus onto a single field is the best choice.

Since he stop podcasting, he saw an mass increase in his blog traffic.  Ending his drop shipping business means he can focus on his clothing flipping business; netting him more income than his previous side hustle.  Overtime, he winds up becoming a master of the art of blogging.  Realizing he’s making more money blogging than flipping clothes, he stops selling used clothes online and become obsessed and dedicated to blogging alone.

When you stick to one thing alone, magic happens.  You’re not spread out; tiring yourself and burning out. People see you as a respected authority figure because you’re not juggling five different things.  You are netting yourself more attention with one project than multiple. Your audience won’t feel alienated or confused because you’re not playing the switch up game every day.  Your brand won’t have an identity crisis.    And, if done right, you’ll become the top 10% of your field.

Let’s use Son Goku of the Dragon Ball series as an example of mastery of one field.

master_UI_Goku
What mastery of one thing looks like

Goku sticks with only one thing: martial arts.  Since childhood, he spent every morning, afternoon, and night training his body, mind, and spirit through the combat arts. Nothing else.  Goku wakes up, trains, learn from masters, “protect” the world from bad guys, sleep, and repeats the process.  You’re not gonna see Goku playing the guitar with Kaori from Your Life in April.   He isn’t going to spread himself out by running a shady business on the dark web like that Devil Arcana guy from Persona 3.  He is obsessed with fighting and fighting alone. It’s why he can throw down with the best in the universe.

***

On the flip side, sticking to one alone can grow stale if you’re not upgrading or reinventing yourself.  Eventually you will get bored.  You’ll hit a peak and struggle.   Your audience will want something new and leave you if you can’t provide anything fresh.  You want something new.  Therefore, you should branch out.  If you’re a blogger, perhaps branch out into the world of podcast after you spent years mastering the art of blogging.  If you’re a cosplayer, try entering the world of fashion. If you blog about anime start watching live action shows. If you never grew up watching classic shows, then you can talk about the shows you miss out thanks to your fresher mindset.

There’s nothing wrong with branching out.

Until next time

-Yuki The Snowman

FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA:

The Swarthy Nerd Podcast
A Black nerd empowerment podcast where Black nerds (well, all nerds, but Black first and foremost) can get together and talk freely about nerd culture while also acknowledging systematic white supremacy and racism in the nerd and Eastern otaku fandoms. Every Tuesday join @superlostfan108 and @weebtrashyuki the founders of http://www.swarthynerd.com for there very informative podcast talking about all things nerdy. No desperate boot licking self hating negus who were never accepted by Black norimes for being too weird for  their love of anime and comic books by the Black community allowed. Go drink bleach.

Instagram: YukiTheSnowMan314

My Facebook Page:
Yuki The Snowman
https://www.facebook.com/yukithesnowman/

“Personal’” Facebook:
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Twitter:
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25 Days Of Blogging Day 7: Social Media: The New Age Drug

The 25 Days of Blogging.  Instead of cheesy lame Christmas movies you get superior knowledge and information form a drunk, Holiday hating Grinch.

(Day 6 and Part 1 of Social Media: The New Age Drug)

Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Marijuana. Alcohol. Heroine.  What do they have in common?  Free, easy dopamine access and effects.  They give their users worthless, unearned highs.  Why put forth the effort and hard work for a natural high when you can net yourself an alternate that requires no work? Stick a needle to your arm. Press down on the syringe.  Let the drug flow through your veins.  Instant high. Instant dopamine. Repeat.  Stick your phone’s camera up to your face. Press down on the record button. Talk endlessly about a subject matter. Get likes.  Get comments. Instant high. Instant dopamine. Repeat.

One method is legal. The other is illegal. But, they’re still can be destructive.

Let’s do a few strange comparisons. Social media is the modern day drug house where hopeless, lifeless junkies gather; searching for their next high to escape their horrible reality. Instead of crack whores sucking on a crack pipe, you have physically beautiful, yet mentality vain and narcissistic young women sucking on phallic-like items for the attention of and validation from thirsty guys. Socially awkward depressed white nerds are your drug dealers who supply your memes they created in their drug houses (meme pages).  They get their follows hooked on their content and the followers can’t stop coming back for more.

(The difference is that real drug dealers have a social life, courage, and can get women – unlike meme page owners).

Such with illicit drugs, shares, likes, views, and comments make social media junkies feel better about himself or herself.  As soon as they hear a “ding!”go off or a bird tweet, you can bet that they will quickly reach for their device and see what content they posed got a like or a comment.  It’s worse if they run a popular page on Facebook or Instagram.  They can’t stop raving about the thousands they like generated a day. Nor will they won’t shut up about how many mindless zombie followers they obtained a month.

Fucking digital druggie e-hippies.

These digital and drug junkies love using these drugs as a means to deal and escape their problems. The lowly worker gets himself doped up before work to deal with their shitty boss.  The straight edge lowly social media whore recklessly rants about their boss on their page. Men get drunk at the local bar to cope with their horrible relationship with their wives.  Little boys go online to talk shit about their girlfriends.  It makes them feel good. The lowly worker doesn’t have the courage to tell their boss to fuck off, walk off the job, and become their own boss.  These boys and men don’t have the courage to cheat or their wives and girlfriends.

You can’t tell these addicts any different.  You try to say that their addiction is an issue and watch them go off the rails. “I can stop anytime I want to!  Just let me take this one last hit!” “I can get off Facebook at any time!  Just let me post one more sad selfie of myself for attention!”  They’re hooked! They feel the heat of withdraw.  They can’t stop going back.

Ever notice how both internet and drug junkies love talking down to others who aren’t addicted to the bullshit? To my straight edge readers: ever had a drinker or a weedhead shame you for not drinking or smoking?  Had it happened to a straight-edge associate of mines a few years back ago at an anime convention after party. Some drunken fat party weeaboo chick tried to shame him because he doesn’t drink and smoke.  She shoved a drink to his face, pressuring him to drink.  He knocked the drink away from his face and walked away: chest out, face up, back straight. The fat weeaboo chick went on a triad and left.

You tell somebody who’s addicted to their phone that you’re not on social media because it’s a waste of time and watch them go beserek.  “How can you not be on social media? You must have no friends! Nobody must like you! You’re so lame” No bitch. You’re the lame one with no friends. That’s why you’re on the fake world a.k.a social media. You would kill yourself if Facebook or Instagram shut down for good.

I’ll say this: Despite the condescending tone of this post (I’m highly aware of it) I’m not straight edge – nor am I totally against social media usage.  I enjoy drinking alcohol and smoking weed. Hell, I even do shrooms  from time-to-time. I’m on social media as well.  Just like I love connecting with old friends and family on social media and interacting with fellow nerds on my weeaboo page, I love drink a bottle of wine with a blunt on a side at the park after work.

But, everything in moderation.

Until next time

-Yuki The Snow Man

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A Black nerd empowerment podcast where Black nerds (well, all nerds, but Black first and foremost) can get together and talk freely about nerd culture while also acknowledging systematic white supremacy and racism in the nerd and Eastern otaku fandoms. Every Tuesday join @superlostfan108 and @weebtrashyuki the founders of http://www.swarthynerd.com for there very informative podcast talking about all things nerdy. No desperate boot licking self hating negus who were never accepted by Black norimes for being too weird for  their love of anime and comic books by the Black community allowed. Go drink bleach.

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25 Days of Blogging Day 3: Being (And Becoming) the Best Version of Yourself

25 Days of Blogging: It’s like ABC’s 25 Days of Christmas, but without the white people level of cheesiness, bad acting, and family friendliness.

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Day 2

Yesterday, I spoke on why being yourself isn’t a good idea for most, if not, all situations.  In short, being yourself can get your screwed over, make you lose your job, and lose respect.  At the end of the post, I stated that you want to be the best version of yourself instead.  Well today we’re going to continue on what that means.

Being the best version of you simply means that you’re tackling problems, situations,  and issues through smart and hard work, experiences, and learning from not only your losses, but wins as well. You won’t know how to grow as a person until you go through it and learn from each and every trial life throws at you: positive or negative.

These experiences can come from dealing with losing love ones (giving you a stoic mindset of accepting death as a part of life), cutting shitty “friends” out of your life (so people of high value can come into your life to better it),  sacrificing short-term pleasure for long-term goals/satisfaction, embracing failure (which we will go in-depth  later on), and traveling the world to experience the cultures and customs of others  (gifting you a worldly view of the world) to name a few ways to pave your path to the best version of you.

Becoming the best version of you also means knowing what masks to wear.  You don’t want to keep your mask off when at work; rather, you want to put on your worker’s mask. This means that before you even come to work, you mentality and physical prep for work at home (eating a protein heavy breakfast for energy, making sure your freshly washed and clean clothes are ironed and pressed , and leaving personal issues at home when you leave the house). Next, when you enter your job, you go over what you need to do to generate the best results through your performance and enter your zone until it time to clock out.

 

When it comes with dealing with the world through the general public, you must be aware that you still need to be the best version of you. You leverage this by taking care of and being self-aware of your appearance.

Who do you think is going to be respected: some 20-year-old kid who’s growing a poor excuse of a beard with his pathetic, patchy stubble who’s wearing dirty, dusty shoes with the tongue leaning, mismatched socks, baggy cargo pants, and a graphic tee featuring an big breasted anime woman who’s about to burst out of her bar while doing an ahegao face; or a 30-year-old man sporting a clean, shined dress shoes, socks that matches his tailor fit pair of chinos, a wrist watch, fitted oxford dress shirt, a tailored blazer, and has a his beard trimmed or cleanly shaven off?

(Please weeaboos: Don’t put emotions into this)

The man is clearly showing the world the best version of him is going to be respected over the stupid kid wearing that weeaboo shit.  Are both people in the example above being themselves?  You can argue that yes, they are.  But, we can all agree that the man is being the best version of himself – not being himself (he could also be an anime fan like the kid, but he isn’t going to wear a graphic t-shirt of  anime women doing something sexual out in public).

Being the best version of yourself requires you to get over your fears: may they be failure, rejection, pain, and setbacks, whatever.  For those unaware, the featured image is of this post is that of Ai Mizuno from the hit Fall 2018 idol anime Zombie Lang Saga.  Without giving too much away, Ai is trying to convince friend and fellow zombie idol group member Sakura to get over her fears of bad luck and failure that plagued her life before death.

Ai tells Sakura that she doesn’t view failure and mistakes as bad things; as they’ll help her with whatever comes next on her path. Only then, by overcoming those things, she’ll become the best version of herself (a callback to an interview Ai did during a TV special with her old idol group which inspired Sakura to pull herself out of her depression and becoming an idol before her death and zombification).

ai_chan_wallpaper.png
Wallpaper of my work laptop for 2020

People who don’t overcome their fears block their own progress of becoming their best version.  It’s natural to have fear, but it’s unnatural to allow fear to control you.  You will fail.  You will face rejection.  You will be hurt. You will be met with setbacks.  But, you have to embrace those things in order to become the best.  Being the best version of yourself doesn’t mean doing what makes you happy (although it does help a lot), but doing the things that make yourself uncomfortable.  But you gotta get yourself out of your comfort zone.

Only then, will you be able to become the best version of yourself.

-Until next time,
Yuki The SnowMan

IMAGES SOURCES:

Weeaboo dude image source:

Man in blazer and chinos:

How to Style a Navy Blazer + Our Picks

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A Black nerd empowerment podcast where Black nerds (well, all nerds, but Black first and foremost) can get together and talk freely about nerd culture while also acknowledging systematic white supremacy and racism in the nerd and Eastern otaku fandoms. Every Tuesday join @superlostfan108 and @weebtrashyuki the founders of http://www.swarthynerd.com for there very informative podcast talking about all things nerdy. No desperate boot licking self hating negus who were never accepted by Black norimes for being too weird for  their love of anime and comic books by the Black community allowed. Go drink bleach.

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Uncategorized 2

25 Days of Blogging Day 2: Never Be Yourself

25 Days of Blogging: It’s like the 25 Days of Christmas, but without the cheesiness, horrible family members coming to visit you, and dealing with soul crushing holiday depression. 

Day 1: The Type of Isekai  I Want To See

they_wont_understand_you_in_japan

Throughout life, people will offer you this horrible piece of advice: “Be yourself”.  Why is that?  Because, apparently, being yourself somehow gets you everything you want in this world.  People will treat you with respect if you’re just being yourself.  You can make a lot of friends being you.  If you just be yourself ,somehow everything else will fall into place for you.

I’m going to tell you something that is the opposite of what your parents, peers, and teachers taught you: Never be yourself.  Being yourself can set you up for failure.

Example: Let’s say, naturally, you’re a nice person. You’re kind and sweet to everyone, never wanting to rock the boat or step on the toes of others.  You go through life with your head down; never making a scene and avoiding conflict.  That can be amazing until people see that you’re a pushover whom can be taken advantage of.  Somebody ask you to do something that you know you don’t want to. Yet, because you’re too much of a cowardly bitch to say no, you agree to it. Now, you’re filled with regret.

Can’t be nice all the damn time – it doesn’t get you far in life.

Not a nice person but you have a backbone?  That’s awesome.  I respect people who make sure others don’t come after for them and won’t take advantage of them.  I have high levels of appreciation for those who stand strong and plant their feet on the ground against others.   You may even have an “I don’t give a fuck” attitude, and that’s perfect…for some situation.  Having a no fucks given attitude can either hurt or help you.  Having a no fucks given attitude towards not landing a job after an interview can help you not give up on future job interviews because you don’t fear rejection.

Showing up to work smelling like weed and alcohol because you don’t give a fuck about your job anymore will hurt you: because now you’re unemployed, the lights of your house got shut off, and the dude who fronted you that eighth of loud has been blowing up your phone for the past week asking for the money (that you don’t have any more because you don’t have a job)

Being you isn’t always the best course of action.  Just because you love wearing your Pikachu shirt in public to express how much you haven’t grown up you love anime and video games doesn’t mean you should wear that shit to a professional setting  such as a business conference or meeting (remember: people will judge you based off appearance).  On the opposite side, being all about business and work will turn others off.  It’s okay to have a hobby such as Pokemon if you’re a businessman.

You may be wondering what you should do instead of being yourself?
What you should do instead is be the best version of yourself, which I will cover tomorrow.

Until next time,
-Yuki The Snowman

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The Swarthy Nerd Podcast
A Black nerd empowerment podcast where Black nerds (well, all nerds, but Black first and foremost) can get together and talk freely about nerd culture while also acknowledging systematic white supremacy and racism in the nerd and Eastern otaku fandoms. Every Tuesday join @superlostfan108 and @weebtrashyuki the founders of http://www.swarthynerd.com for there very informative podcast talking about all things nerdy. No desperate boot licking self hating negus who were never accepted by Black norimes for being too weird for  their love of anime and comic books by the Black community allowed. Go drink bleach.

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Uncategorized 1

The Guts to Be What You Wanna Be

 

Drunk. Quiet. Angry.

There’s a lonely man slumped in his in chair in a high-end restaurant filled with so-called “good” rich people.  They’re piercing stares of shame, judgment, and disgust do not faze him at the least. They can be heard whispering and chattering about his pathetic state. There’s a few seconds of silence followed by the man demanding the people “what you looking at?”.

Silence.
Then, the man speaks.

“You’re all a buncha fuckin’ assholes. You know why? You don’t have the guts to be what you wanna be!”

He slowly rises from his slumped state and resumes his triad.

“You need people like me! You need people like me, so you can point your fucking fingers, and say ‘that’s the bad guy’!”

He’s stumbling: effects of the alcohol and drugs he consumed earlier kicking it. Despite his impairment, he glares at the rich people, whom are clearly at unease at his actions. He asks everyone if – unlike him – they’re good because he’s bad.

No response.
He answers for them.

“You’re not good. You just know how to hide.  How to lie.”

Following that, he declares that he doesn’t have a those problems.  He proudly states that despite being a lair, he is always telling the truth.  As his bodyguards guides him towards the exit, he asks everyone to say goodnight to the bad guy; as this is the last bad guy of his caliber that they ever will see in their lifetime.

The scene described above is of course the iconic Scarface restaurant monologue.  Our lead and titular character, Tony “Scarface” Monata, has infamously built an ill rep for himself throughout the Miami underworld, news media, and public as a multi-millionaire criminal overlord.  He is all aware of his sins – and he’s not ashamed of it.  He knows who he is.  He knows he is a sinner. He knows he’s a bad guy. Rather running away from it, he embraces it.

He has the guts to be what he wants to be.

*****

Tony Monata is a fictional character.  His tale is of fiction. However, we cannot deny the fact that what he spoke in that restaurant is reality.  It is the truth. When you have guts, you’ll be met with opposition. Either they’ve given up on being who they want to be, or they hide it from the general public; shamming those who’re doing “ill” deeds (while hiding their worse deeds from the world)

They cannot stand the sight of those who are confident with whom they are.  They are envious of them: as they’re a reflection of what they can never be in life.  The people of Miami hated Scarface.  Not because he was a drug dealer, but because of his courageous, outlaw spirit.  It is because he brought to light what they do in the dark.

We see this in the real world often. A black man speaks out against the vile actions against his community at the hands of white supremacist. The powers that be silence him for it.  They know he’s telling the truth.  They know that they are full of shit.  History is filled with proof of their inhumane deeds that they deny.  They fear that he’ll wake his  community up. If they wake up, they will create a resistance group against white supremacy and expose their lies. So, they pull up his criminal record and ill deeds from 20 years ago. If he doesn’t have one, they make one up.  They speak of his ill deeds of the past.  Anything to discredit and sully his name in order to keep their hands clean.  It doesn’t bother him one bit.  He has the guts to be true to himself.
It takes guts to stand against an oppression system.

A young actress speaks out against the sexual abuse within the entertainment industry. She has witnessed Hollywood executives and producers coerce teenage girls to perform sexual favors for roles against their will.  She makes the world know what is going behind closed doors in Hollywood with the notorious casting couch.  Her heart forbids her to allow these foul actions to continue. So, she blows the whistle against it: exposing their deeds to the world.  The cowardly predators smear her name.  They blacklist her; making sure she never lands a major role in a movie or TV.  She cannot get any work.  She’s labeled as the bad guy. But she is unfazed by it all. She’s labeled as the bad guy.  She knew that saving young girls from this will come with a heavy price.  But, she doesn’t care.

It takes guts to defend your gender against an oppression group.
You can not let cowards rule this world.

In the realm of anime, anime is filled with many valiant characters who embrace who they are without fear.

The spirited  Gearless Joe of the Spring 2018 hit anime Megalo Box refused to throw match after match, despite the pleads of his chicken-shit trainer and manager, Nanbu.  He cares not for the politics of Shirato group’s Megalonia boxing tournament, the tournament’s prize money, the fame that goes with it, and throwing matches for the illegal gambling ring surrounding the tournament.   He wants the fight of the lifetime with the champion, Yuri.

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Haruhi Suzumiya, titular character of the iconic light novel and anime series The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya embraced this ideology at a young age.  She vowed to let the world know that she exist through her life mission of making every day an adventure for herself by discovering interesting and mysterious people and things.  Rather than to fade into the background of the world stage, she was driven to become the main actress on it; regardless if she lived in Japan – a nation known for hammering down nails that stick out.

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In this world, you cannot be bothered by what others think of you.  You’re given a limited amount of time to live your life.  If there’s something you want to do, then do it. Yes: People will judge you.  Yes: people will shun you.  Yes: People will no longer be friends with you or want to be in your circle. They will call you “weird”, “an asshole”, “strange’, whatever words they can think of to make them feel better about their lack of courage and make you feel bad about your everlasting levels of it.

But, you have to embrace that.  Having the guts to be who you want to be comes with that. Don’t get me wrong: I am not telling you do anything illegal or immoral.  If you are, you deserve to be shun. You deserve to lose your friends.  Other than that, embrace who you are.  Don’t live in fear over what others think.  You don’t have time to do that.

Wasting your time being in fear of what others may think of you is for cowards.
Do not be a coward.

 

Fakeness fears realness.
Cowards shun the courageous.

Japan 2

Hikikomori: The Digital Age Hermit

Editor’s Note:  This is a text version of episode 32 of my friend and I podcast “The Swarthy Nerd Podcast” . It has been edited for this blog.  You can listen to the episode in full by clicking on this link. Please enjoy! 

 

Japan: A nation rich in cultural tradition, technological advancement, animation innovation, and an unreal politeness. It’s a peaceful county that holds the status quo on the highest pedestal.   From childhood to adulthood, the Japanese are expected to follow the status quo, daring not to stand out from the crowd; as they will be hammered down like a nail sticking out from the board.

You’re expected by society and by your family to work hard. At school, work, and for the general public, Japanese citizens must put on their best face (or tatemae 建前, たてまえ lit. “façade”); regardless of what they might be going through in their personal life thanks to the nation’s intense conformist nature.

But, what happen when this intense conformist nature Japan is known for becomes too much for one person to bear?  Let’s say a salary-man gets chastise by his boss for a one minor mistake that can be easily fix.  In America, we might get in our feelings over the matter for a split second then seek to correct the issue.  In Japan however, the salary-man will cave in, withdraw into his shell, and finish the work for the day – never returning to work the following day.

Instead, he’ll lock himself away in his disgusting, trashy room of his parent’s house in a state of deep depression for months or even years. He doesn’t interact with the outside world beyond the virtual, online world – a world in which he feels is much safer than brutal reality.  He wastes his time and life away watching anime and playing video games; never contributing to society.  His parents provide his need out of “support” until they grow old and die.  They don’t know what else to do with him or get him out of this state.

This man is a member of Japan’s missing one million: hikikomori (ひきこもり or 引きこもりlit. Pulling inward, being confined).  A social phenomenon with origins dating from the mid-1980s and appearing in the Japanese mainstream in the late 1990s, the hikikomori is the modern-day reclusive hermit who has withdrawn from all social interactions.

According to the 2016 Japanese census report, 540,000 people aged 15-39 are considered hikikomori. However, some experts has estimated that the number is 1.55 million (since hikikomori do not interact with society and prefer to be hidden) and growing.  This condition can go on for years – even decades – and this is a problem that Japan must address before it worsen.

There are hikikomori that in their 40s (the first generation) who have not left their aging parents’ house in decades, leading to Japan’s “2030 Problem”; an issue in which the hikikomori baby boomer parents are entering their 60s, 70s, and 80s; therefore, they  cannot provide for their hikikomori children (due to retirement, illness, and death).  With the parents dying, this causes concern as many are wondering who’ll take care of these hermits and what to do to help them come out of their shells.

In this episode of the Swarthy Nerd Podcast, we will explore one of Japan’s infamous dark side: the hikikomori. What is a Hikikomori?  Why so many men in Japan are withdrawing from society and causing a strain on the Japanese economy and their family? And could America experience their unique version of the Hikikomori.

JOIN US!

 

PART I
BREAKING DOWN THE HIKIKOMORI

 

Before acknowledging why Japanese youth are becoming Hikikomori, we must analyze what causes and does not cause Hikikomori. 80% of Hikikomori are male; with the reminding 20% are females. The average age of Hikikomori is around mid-20s. However, there are reports of   Hikikomori in their teens and 50s. A Hikikomori must’ve not partaken in society for a period exceeding six months.

They are not employed, seeking employment, or in educational training (NEET). Forms of entertainment fill their time, for example: video games, internet, and television.   While it’s possible for some Hikikomori to suffer from pathological problem disorder such as autism, borderline personality disorder (BPD), schizophrenia, et cetera, Hikikomori itself isn’t considered nor treated as a pathological disorder.

The following items are what don’t make one Hikikomori. Simply going from home to work and only having interactions with people from those places doesn’t make the criteria for Hikikomori; as you’re employed and interacting with society.  Non-conformity isn’t hikikomori.  While Hikikomori itself is an extreme example of non-conformity, the act itself isn’t inherently Hikikomori. Japanese Herbivore Men who don’t desire a relationship with the opposite sex aren’t Hikikomori; as most are social.  Understanding what makes and does not make a Hikikomori based on the factors listed above; we can begin to look into the reasoning behind the why.

 

PART II

WHY JAPANESE YOUTHS ARE BECOMING HIKIKOMORI

Referring back to the introduction of this essay/episode, Japan is a conformist nation where individuality is frown upon. Their youth are expected to aim high towards academic, social, and career success.  Matt Davis’s article for BigThink.com on Hikikomori and the rigidness of Japan goes further on such expectations:

“Like most behavioral issues, it’s difficult to pin down exactly what mechanism lies behind it. However, there are some common features.

Japan is a very rigid, structured society, and the pressure starts early. Students are expected to study constantly, the school year lasts six weeks longer than in the U.S., and, when the Ministry of Education reduced the school week from six days a week, many parents began enrolling their children in juku, or “cram schools,” to fill in the extra hours with as much education as possible. Because of the emphasis on exams in Japan, about half of all junior high students in Japan attend juku.

Combined with the fact that the period from 1990 to 2010 saw very little economic growth in Japan, many students questioned the purpose of their high-intensity education when there was little guarantee of work at the end of it.

Social life in Japan, too, is highly structured and etiquette practices can quickly become complex depending on the situation and the others involved. For example, Japanese has many grammatical structures that vary depending on the exact nature of the person being addressed, whether they’re a superior, an employee, a customer, an older woman or man, a younger woman or man, and many others. Giving gifts is common, but certain items are considered impolite. Giving a kitchen knife to a newlywed couple is a no-no, since this implies separation.

What’s more significant than the specific rituals and rules in Japanese culture, the general, pervasive sense of propriety and correct behavior can be stifling. It is impossible to go through life without embarrassing yourself socially at least once, but in a culture where correct behavior is highly valued, slipping up in this regard can be traumatizing.

Often, a triggering academic or social failure prompts young men and women to withdraw from society and become hikikomori. It’s also been speculated that this social phenomenon is due, in part, to a culture of shame surrounding mental health issues. Depression wasn’t even recognized as a real condition until the late 1990s in Japan, and it is sometimes still seen as an excuse to take time off of work. Rather than be labelled as depressed or anxious, the term hikikomori paints people with a broader brush.”

And from William Kremer and Claudia Hammond’s BBC News article Hikikomori: Why Are So Many Japanese Men Refusing to Leave Their Homes:

The trigger for a boy retreating to his bedroom might be comparatively slight – poor grades or a broken heart, for example – but the withdrawal itself can become a source of trauma. And powerful social forces can conspire to keep him there.

One such force is sekentei, a person’s reputation in the community and the pressure he or she feels to impress others. The longer hikikomori remain apart from society, the more aware they become of their social failure. They lose whatever self-esteem and confidence they had and the prospect of leaving home becomes ever more terrifying.”

Let’s refer back to the word tatemae.  As tatemae literally means “façade” or “pretense”, you will display a sort of masquerade of “happiness” and “carefreeness” for society: never revealing your true face, or honne (本音 ,ほんね). What is honne? Honne literally translate to “true voice” or the dark thoughts you keep hidden from the world. Thoughts such as “My boss’s idea is so fucking stupid; he needs to be fired!”,  “I want to kill my bullies”, and “I’m tired of you crying about your problems all the time”.

The clash between tatemae and honne births inner conflict. You want to speak out about what’s bothering you or how you truly feel about a situation, but you live in Japan: a country of conformity – with tatemae a major component of Japanese social conformity.

Balancing between honne and tatemae for the Japanese can be stressful to the point that it can drive many to isolation.  Why face the world with a façade, never being allowed to express your true thoughts when you can alienate yourself from said world?    However, isolation is a dangerous trap.  Having others support you won’t work well in the long run.

PART III

The Strain Hikikomori Cause

Hikikomori refusing employment and educational training to support themselves causes an ill effect on the Japanese economy and their caregivers.  The Japanese workforce is dwindling as the numbers of Hikikomori increases.  Aged  Hikikomori whom decided to return to society find  reintegration difficult; as they lack the (job) skills to generate income —  especially as they’re entering the worst job market in modern history (the lingering effect of the 2008 market crash).

When discussing the caregivers of Hikikomori, we must bring up two set of numbers: 2030 and 8050. 2030 represent the year in which the first generation of Hikikomori will turn 50 while their caregiver parents will turn 80 (with some Hikikomori turning 65 even).  By this time, the caregiver parent(s) of their Hikikomori child have long since retired and eventually died; leaving the Hikikomori without their primary support system.

Diving into the morbid, there are reported cases in which parents of the Hikikomori have passed away in their house. Due to Hikikomori’s lack and fear of social interactions, few Hikikomori have spent days or even weeks with the decaying body or bodies of their decreased parent(s) for days or weeks before contacting law enforcement.

Example 1: Late November-Early December 2013: 34-year-old shut-in  man from Osaka, Japan was arrested for corpse abandonment after reporting his father passing in their house – two weeks after his death.  Did not contact the police due to Hikikomori state  Source: https://soranews24.com/2013/12/16/man-finds-dead-father-lives-with-the-body/

Example 2: November 9th, 2018: 49-year-old shut-in from The Kanagawa Prefectural arrested for failing to report the death of his 76-year-old mother after sister of the Hikikomori male discover their mother’s body in her bedroom. The mother died in mid-October. Source: https://nextshark.com/japanese-hikikomori-mom/

Now, imagine hearing multiple reports of rotting bodies of the Hikikomori parents discovered in their houses because of the Hikikomori’s extreme social anxiety in 2030. I fear that it’ll be the norm come 11 years from now.

PART IV

The American Hikikomori

 

For decades, it was believed that the Hikikomori phenomenon was a Japanese exclusive problem; a cultural issue of sorts.  While not as extreme in Japan, there have been case studies of the Hikikomori in the United States.  In her February 2019 article for the New York Magazine titled When ‘Going Outside Is Prison’: The World of the American Hikikomori, Allie Conti spoke with 21-year-old reddit user “Luca” through private messaging about his case of Hikikomori dating back from the age of 12.  During class, he’d become so anxious that he’d forgot to swallow.  The anxiety led his mother to remove him from school and take online classes – which he would soon drop out of those courses as well.

After watching the anime series Welcome to the N.H.K (an anime about a Hikikomori man “discovering” Japanese broadcasting company N.H.K, or Nippon Hoso Kyokai, translation: Japan Broadcasting Corporation conspiracy to transform Japanese youths into shut-ins), Luca decided to quit school and forego work as a personal rebellion against the world (meaning he’s a lazy ass white boy who needs to grow a pair of balls).

University of California researcher Alan R. Teo theorized that Hikikomori-like conditions are coming into the light in America. In 2010, the mother of a 30-year-old anime fan contacted Teo after her son, “Mr. H”, read one of Teo’s translation; leading him to diagnosed himself with Hikikomori.  From the New York Magazine article:

“Teo encouraged Mr. H. to come by his office at the University of California in San Francisco for treatment, despite the fact that would mean stepping outside for the first time in three years. Mr. H. wore a leather jacket that reeked of cigarette smoke, had mangy hair, didn’t shower, and had long fingernails. “During the first and most severe year, he remained within a walk-in closet, ate only-ready-to-eat food, did not bathe, and urinated and defecated in jars and bottles,” Teo would later write in the International Journal of Social Psychiatry.

“He passed the time surfing the internet and playing video games.” Tests run on Mr. H showed seemingly conflicting results. While he exhibited traits consistent with obsessive compulsive and schizoid personality disorders, various scales and inventories concluded he had neither. Mr. H. claimed his reclusiveness was based on something pretty simple: He just didn’t want to be a part of the world, which is both what hikikomori in Japan had long said and basically what Luca told me.”

Throughout America, a large number of young men are isolating themselves in their parent’s basement bedrooms.  They cannot cope with work, school, and lack motivation to launch themselves. Recent economic crisis combined with the labor market has discouraged recent college graduates, especially given when 12.6% of college grads are underemployed (source: https://www.epi.org/publication/class-of-2016/) Princeton researchers suggests that technological usage such as video games and social media has led to a 23-46% decrease of young men working in the labor force (source: https://scholar.princeton.edu/sites/default/files/maguiar/files/leisure-luxuries-labor-june-2017.pdf).

We must not also forget that the 69% of college grad are entering the real world with with an average of $29,800 worth of debt – something that an average min. wage job cannot pay off (source: https://www.cnbc.com/2019/05/20/how-much-the-average-student-loan-borrower-owes-when-they-graduate.html).

With seemly unpayable debt, a weaken work force, and an economy that’s expected to crash soon, more and more American youth are partakning in the hikikimori lifestyle to escape reality.  This is not good for the American society.  If this problem continues in America I fear we will see the same problems with Hikikomori in Japan with Americans – especially with most male Hikikomori in the West are radicalized through white supremacist and incel groups.

FINAL PART

Yuki’s And TV Guru’s Thoughts on Hikikomoris

 

Yuki: “First off Japan, stop shamming people for failure: everyone fails. There’s a difference between failure and stupidity.  Shame people for being stupid, but don’t shame them for failure.  Another way to prevent hikikomori is reduce the workload on workers and students alike.  You got people in Japan working 12-18 hours a day and it’s literally killing them (karoshi lit. death from overwork). Finally, stop shamming people with mental health issues; people in Japan are afaird to admit their issues due to the stigma link with mental health. Why would people admit they have mental health issues if they are being shammed for it?”

TV Guru: “Same thing, you can’t be fucking shaming somebody for failing. But, that’s the pressure they put on society.  You can’t pressure somebody into working hard. Yea Japanese people are smart because they spend hours studying but all that long-term studying comes with a price…”

****

“The world is dangerous and enemies are everywhere – everyone has to protect themselves.  A fortress seems the safest.  But isolation exposes you to more dangers than it protects you from – it cuts you off from valuable information, it makes you conspicuous and an easy target. Better to circulate among people, find allies, mingle.  You are shielded from your enemies by the crowd.”

“The weight of society’s pressure to conform, and the lack of distance from other people, can make it impossible to think clearly about what’s going on around you.  As a temporary recourse, then, isolation can help you gain perceptive. The danger is, however, that this kind of isolation will sire all kinds of strange and perverted ideas.  You main gain perspective on the larger picture, but you lose a sense of your own smallness and limitations.  Also, the more isolated you are, the harder it is to break out of your isolation when you chose to – it sinks you deep into its quicksand with your you noticing.”

-Robert Greene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anime community 0

Reflecting on the KyoAni Arson Massacre

In my 20+ years of being an anime fan, the thought of a twisted individual committing mass murder against those within the have anime industry never crossed my mind.  Anime studios are known to receive death threats from disgruntled fans for whatever reason. Studios dismiss threats because those who send them never follow through with them. They are treated as people who talk a big action but never follow through.  Thus, (and sadly) death threats aren’t taken as seriously as they should within the industry at times.

Until recently.

On July 18th, 2019 around early morning at the Kyoto Animation studio, 33 lives – mostly young people who not only just got their start in the anime industry,  but in life in general – were senselessly taken from the world.  Their stories, wisdom, ideas, and creativity for the anime industry will never to be brought to life for the world to see – because of one angry disgusting man whom decided to end their lives. Buildings can be recovered and restored, yes.  Alas, we can not recover nor restored the talented lives that were lost.

It’s reported that the murderer was angry at Kyoto Animation (KyoAni) because they stolen something from him.  It’s rumor that what was stolen from him was a light novel idea that KyoAni allegedly rejected and used said idea for one of their anime production.  Out of anger, he broke into the main studio, pour gasoline on not only around the entrance of the building (to prevent people to escape the building) as well as inside it, but on his victims.

Even if KyoAni did steal this man’s novel idea, it is no reason for him to commit murder — let alone mass murder — through such inhumane means of turning a beloved animation studio into a death trap; burning people to death in the process.  As a creative person, I understand the rage of having people steal your ideas/works and claiming them as their own.  I would be livid if somebody stole my works and gain something from it.  I even admit that I would  go as far as to cause physical harm against a person if they stole my works. But, to commit (mass) murder over something I could prove was mines or creative a better version of it is maddening and illogical.

What was so valuable about that horrible man’s work that he had to take so many lives over it?

Is the love for one’s own art that extreme that people should be murdered over it?

 -Benjamin Snow

Anime Industry 1

Kyoto Animation Arson Attack: 30+ Injured And Multiple Fatalities Reported

Multiple people confirmed dead and 30+ injured at famous Kyoko animation studio from alleged arson attack. According to reports, police captured and arrested a man in his 40s who admitted to police he used a liquid accelerate to start the fire.

FROM ANIME NEWS NETWORK: “According to a report by The Kyoto Shimbun newspaper, nearby residents heard an explosion on the first floor of the building. NHK also quoted a man who supposedly heard an explosion in the building at around 10:30 a.m. JST, after which a fire erupted in the building’s second and third floor.” Kyoto Animation is an animation studio and light novel publisher founded in 1981.

Kyoto Animation is most famous for producing popular series and movies such as “Full Metal Panic!”, “The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya”, “Clanned”, “Free!” and “A Silent Voice”.

My Personal Thoughts: Anime — and entertainment in general — isn’t that serious to the point that you have to commit arson and murder. If you’re gonna kill somebody, kill them because they harmed/killed a family member or they’re threatening to kill/harm you. Don’t lose your freedom and endanger others over some damn cartoons.

SOURCES:

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20190718_31/
https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/daily-briefs/2019-07-17/kyoto-police-multiple-deaths-confirmed-in-kyoto-animation-fire/.149101

 

Anime community 4

There Will Always Be A Need For Fan-Run Conventions

As I was reading through the comments of my post  inquiring information on the Ontario, California based anime convention Anime Los’ Angeles (ALA) and how it compare to Anime Expo (AX), there were a few comments that caught my attention.  These comments focused on the fact that ALA was a fan run convention that will never succumb to corporate greed and draw in the normies (unlike Anime Expo and San Diego Comic Con according to these commentators).

Personally, I’m a fan of corporate and industry  ran conventions (or at the very least, conventions who have some sponsorship from corporations and members of the industry). Anime conventions with corporate/industry backing have the means to bring in the big name heavy hitters of the anime industry. In addition,  they also allow the major players of the anime industry to have world premiere of new and upcoming anime projects  that you  (almost) never get  the chance to see at your local small-to-medium size anime convention.

Content creators such as myself love attending conventions that feature big name guests as it gives us superior coverage and content for our brand.   It’s not to say that fan-run conventions don’t make for great content, but let’s be real: You’ll get more flies drawn towards your honey pot if your honey pot just happen to have somebody like Mamoru Miyano in it because you reported on him talking about his latest roles during  Anime Expo.

(And no, I did not attend any of his panels at Anime Expo because my Black ass KNEW any and all Mamoru Miyano related panels would be jam packed with fans and I am not willing to stand in line for 10 hours for a seiyuu I’m barely a fan of just for internet traffic).

220px-Miyano_Mamoru_from__GODZILLA_The_Planet_Eater__at_Opening_Ceremony_of_the_Tokyo_International_Film_Festival_2018_(30678349737).jpg
He’s kind of a  big deal in the weeaboo world

As nerd culture steadily enter the mainstream limelight, there is this looming shadow of fear that has been overcast on the world of nerd culture. This  fear is of both smaller and larger fan ran conventions yielding  to the all-mighty dollar offered to them by major corporations – forswearing their humble grassroots beginnings.

Can’t blame them on this one, really.  We see this happen often with  conventions grew massive in size and income. They get accused of “selling out” (note: knowing your worth and the worth of your brand isn’t “selling out”; that’s broke jealous dusty nigga/hipster talk).   Once they “sell-out”, the content of the convention becomes water down and lose focus on the fan-driven material in favor of industry related items presented on the programming.  Therefore, the loyal fans of the con since day one up and leave the con.

Now, if you’re a critical thinker, you can see where this is going and know the solution to this problem.  If people are dreading that some big conventions are “selling out” for big businesses, then that means that you are going to have people who are still in favor of fan-run conventions that won’t “sell-out”.

anime_girL_gets_slapped_with_cash.jpg
How ugly dudes get women.

Think about it: you have a market of fans who don’t want anything to do with major conventions that have corporate backing and they’re going searching for cons that are operating on the grassroots level.  They would rather spend their money towards conventions that favor fan-related content and programming over what some Japanese industry  jackass who snorts cocaine off a teenage schoolgirl’s ass while  she’s cosplaying Ichigo from DARLING in the FRANXX  in his office at nighttime  thinks what makes good programming at an anime con (okay, probably isn’t that extreme, but you get my point).

imagine_choosing_zero02_over_ichigo.png
Some scared Japanese girl who just wanted to be a cosplay model and not have some depraved shady Japanese businessman do drugs off her ass while she cosplays as his waifu.

It’s that “for us by us” mentality that most nerds crave when it comes to anime conventions.  Fan run content that shows the true passion and appreciation of fans of this medium in an event that provides the means for such fans to talk about their love for anime – in person with other fellow fans.

Fan-ran events means you have the freedom to express your fandom and love for anime through any means without worrying about an overhead busting your balls telling you what you can and cannot have in your programming (it’s not to say that fan run conventions have overheads busting balls as well, but they’re more lax than say somebody who works for a big anime business).

There’s a certain magic of fan-ran conventions that allow programming such as a room party block with free drinks, a massive cosplay parade downtown,  ribbon collecting, and cosplay stripping shows that most of your major big business ran convention wouldn’t dare allow.   This magic you can’t find at most industry ran conventions. Is it true that these industry cats understand what fans want in terms of content for their cons?  Sure, but it doesn’t mean that they’re gonna provide the means to fulfill said needs.

dragon-con-parade_1535827773081_12830021_ver1.0_1280_720.jpg
Dragon Con Parade. Image source: https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/thousands-to-line-the-streets-for-dragon-con-parade-2018-saturday/825110116

So, will fan-run conventions go away anytime soon?  No. Why?
Because there will always be a need for them – no matter what.